Gardens and Nature Trails

 
Courtyard and
Koi Pond

 
 
Tropical Conservatory  

Wildlife Garden

Recollection Garden
 
 
 
Bird of Prey Trail
 
 
Nature Trail

 


Courtyard Garden and Koi Pond

The Anniston Museum Courtyard has the lush look of the tropics, reminiscent of a hot, humid climate near the equator. Palms and bananas -- the largest public collection in Alabama -- are the heart of this courtyard garden microcosm. It is accented with spectacular flowering plants like hibiscus, lantana, oleander, cannas, and ginger-lilies. The tropical look is one of flamboyant form and contrast, punctuated with sensational colorful blossoms! At its hub is a towering abstract sculpture spouting water into a pool filled with darting koi carp. Come to where the hibiscus unfolds, palm trees sway, and banana plants grow tall.

 


Tropical Conservatory

A jungle paradise continues year-round in our tropical conservatory! It’s a place where foliage is king and where plants produce more flowers in a single season than a temperate one does in its entire lifetime. Moist, warm air is essential to this growing process; you will immediately sense this humid change. There are plants with huge shiny leaves, boldly colored foliage, and brilliantly colored flowers. Visit this exotic indoor garden, where the tropical flowers and foliage will stimulate your senses. 

  


Wildlife Garden

The Wildlife Garden, designed to attract wild birds and animals, features native plants of the southeastern United States. It is certified by the National Wildlife Federation’s Backyard Wildlife Habitat program. Located on the west side of the museum, this garden includes a stone-lined pond with a waterfall nestled among beautiful river birches. This habitat hosts many birds, small mammals and other wildlife. To attract these, the garden provides food, water, cover and places to raise their young. This demonstration garden was created to inspire others to “garden for wildlife” around their homes -- from small city gardens to large, suburban lots.


Recollection Garden

This young garden, created in 2004, was designed as a place of quiet reflection and meditation. Selected trees and shrubs are planted in memory of close friends of Anniston Museum. Traditional roses, peonies, magnolias, and hydrangeas are highlighted by enchanting but lesser known species. The site of this garden was once a neglected area full of unsightly weeds. It is now an attractive, peaceful place to stroll while remembering the ones you love.


Bird of Prey Trail
Get an up-close look at magnificent winged hunters! This special trail is home to permanently injured hawks and owls. These birds of prey cannot be released into the wild because their chance of survival is poor. They now help people learn about their important role in nature. Predators, like these raptors, have always been misunderstood. There was even a time when the government placed a bounty on them! We know better now, and realize that they provide a valuable service by consuming many crop-destroying rodents. 

 


Nature Trail

The Nature Trail, approximately ¾ of a mile long, was named in honor of Mrs. Eugenia G. Brannon in 1985. It has two major loops. The top loop begins on a flat ridge between the “Tree House amphitheater” and adjacent museum. The trail traverses an oak-dominated forest with scattered hickories and pines. The soils are relatively dry and the plants that grow here are adapted to these conditions. The bottom loop begins at the Museum Drive crosswalk (where it connects to the upper loop) halfway up the trail hill toward the museum. Beyond the road lies a low, moist woods situated on the floodplain of an intermittent stream (one that frequently dries completely). It is a lowland forest dominated by tulip-poplar, sweetgum, and red maple. The plant assemblage is differs greatly from the upland forest of the ridge. Moisture loving plants such as ferns are very common.